We Are Survivors 

This blog is dedicated to the tens of millions of adult survivors of child abuse and neglect who get up every day and try to work and function in a world that seems to not care about us.

We Are Survivors

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This is the second to last blog in the Child Abuse Survivors' Voices series. I hope reading about other survivors' experiences has been inspiring, comforting and helped you feel less isolated knowing that you are not alone out there. 

Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Diane says #
    John, I am saddened by your story, but am glad you were able to share it. As long as the American public, our Presidents, and Cong
  • johndt41 says #
    I was abused from birth and abused in all ways. I was abused by parents, extended family and people outside the family including

Over the past 10 years, many survivors have posted comments on blogs I have written (We Are Survivors Blog). I have taken many of the survivors’ public comments and am sharing them with you. Both their pain and hope for a better future are common threads.

Here are three more comments from survivors that I think we can all identify with.

Posted by on in Research

You have a voice and it deserves to be heard!

More comments from survivors that have publicly shared their thoughts over the many years I have been writing We Are Survivors Blog

Over the past 10 years, many survivors have posted comments on blogs I have written (We Are Survivors Blog).  I have taken many of the survivors’ public comments and am sharing them with you. Here you can see how deep the impact of abuse/neglect affects one's spirit and how society's denial perpetuates needless suffering. 

By making our voices heard and speaking out, we can begin to make a difference in this world. These comments reveal the shame survivors face every day.

Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Diane says #
    I am very sorry your family has treated you this way, however, sadly you are not alone. Most abusive families do the same thing, i
  • Secretary45 says #
    My mother turned the family against me and they are disappointed in me so I became estranged. My mother is now dead but my father

In this post, I chose survivor comments that speak of his/her struggle of self-acceptance. This is a monumental task that all survivors face. Hopefully, by sharing our voices we can lessen the pain of our healing journey.

Over the past 10 years, many survivors have posted comments on blogs I have written (We Are Survivors Blog).  I have taken many of the survivors’ public comments and am sharing them with you. Both their pain and hope for a better future are common threads.

Over the past 10 years, many survivors have posted comments on blogs I have written (We Are Survivors Blog).  I have taken many of the survivors’ public comments and am sharing them with you. Both their pain and hope for a better future are common threads.

Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Diane says #
    I know you are being sarcastic, but unfortunately, that is what a lot of people think - rich or poor - "It doesn't happen in our n
  • Ptperez says #
    Behind closed door. . . Incest!? . . . Maybe in Applachia. Not here!

Over the past 10 years, many survivors have posted comments on blogs I have written (We Are Survivors Blog).  I have taken many of the survivors’ public comments and am sharing them with you. Both their pain and hope for a better future are common threads.

Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Diane says #
    My next set of blogs will be a continuation of survivors voices. I am thankful they were able to talk about their concerns openly.
  • Ptperez says #
    Thank you Diane. It is so important to hear these voices

On December 2, 2011, I met with Senator Bob Casey’s office in Washington, DC to provide input into his pending legislation. He had named it the “Speak Up to Protect Every Abused Kid (Speak Up) Act of 2011.” His objective was to make it mandatory that all adults be held responsible in reporting any child abuse they witness.

Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Diane says #
    Alita, what you have described is common to tens of millions of survivors all over America. Society plays its part by sticking the
  • alita says #
    I have only begun to realize the issues I have been dealing with, because of the family violence and addictions that I lived throu
  • Diane says #
    Just like they always have. I walked the halls of Congress for 10 years trying to get SOMEONE to pay attention to the plight of ad
  • Ptperez says #
    So sad. How can the entire Senate ignore this bill?
  • alita says #
    They can ignore the bill, because they don't see that this type of advocacy is going to get them any votes or supporters.

“The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.”

Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Diane says #
    They already know but do not intend to do anything about it.
  • Ptperez says #
    Yeah. Please notify the U.S. Senate!

When children are abused, they begin to question themselves and their world because it destroys two essential beliefs:

  • Their sense of trust, and
  • Their sense of control over their lives.
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Diane says #
    I firmly believe that when survivors get their voices back, this will be the next Civil Rights movement in America. I have been wo
  • De Bruce says #
    I dont even know where to begin. But Thank you Diane for this site and the opportunity to read and hopefully start to speak about
  • Diane says #
    Sadly, what you described happens all over America. People refuse to look at reality and perpetrators go on their merry way. It is
  • Diane says #
    I appreciate your comments. This is the most insidious behavior of anything I've ever read about. The statistics are published yea
  • Secretary45 says #
    When my daughter was born I refused to let my dad anywhere near her. When she was three I told my mum why and that my dad had inte
  • Shannyshans says #
    This is a true but sad point you make Diane, I am happy to join your fight in speaking up for Child abuse Survivors. For too long
  • Diane says #
    I'm happy that you are aware of those feelings (a lot of survivors aren't) as that is the beginning of recovery. Also, that you sa
  • Diane says #
    After 10 years of work, I am beginning to see the Brick Wall of Denial start to crumble a little, and that is a good sign. All of
  • Louiserands says #
    I have been pretending that I'm ok and participating in this world when I haven't. I pretend to trust when I don't . The impact th
  • Ptperez says #
    Dear Diane, Thank you for continuing to chip away at the brick. The wall is thick, but little by little it can break.

The capacity for emotional regulation is one of the major causalities of significant early trauma. Traumatized individuals often suffer significant mood swings, anger, irritability, and profound depression. Numerous studies have established that a history of child abuse increases major depression approximately three-fold compared with non-abused individuals.

While children experience many types of trauma, the most common forms typically occur at the hands of their parents and caregivers. Neglect, physical and sexual abuse are often combined with emotional abuse and exposure to domestic violence. Researchers seeking to understand the effects of trauma on child development often draw distinctions between acute or single incident trauma and chronic trauma, sometimes referred to as Type I and Type II trauma, respectively.

The consequences of childhood trauma constitute a major public health problem. For many children, unaddressed consequences of trauma will adversely affect their entire lives and the lives of those around them. The effects of trauma can be pervasive, impacting on school readiness and performance, diminishing cognitive abilities, and leading to substance abuse, crippling mental disorders and costly physical health problems. Rapid identification of traumatized children could lead to early interventions which can diminish the negative sequelae and save enormous sums of money relative to the cost to society of the consequences in adulthood.

The need to address the long-term effects of child abuse and interpersonal violence by NIH (National Institutes of Health) is critical for the wellbeing of a large percentage of Americans. About 10 years ago, just such a request was made in the April 22, 2005 issue of the journal Science by Jennifer Freyd who is the editor of the Journal of Trauma & Dissociation. She called for the creation of a new National Institute on Child Abuse and Interpersonal Violence – but her call for this Institute was ignored.

Posted by on in Healing

One of the most difficult issues to deal with in therapy is dependency – a state of mind where we are supposed to rely on someone for aid and support – our therapist. Our deepest wounds, though, were inflicted upon us when we were the most vulnerable: when we were loving, trusting, and emotionally available children. As adults, we tell ourselves at some level that that will never happen again.

There is an unusual degree of consensus among child welfare workers, researchers, politicians, criminal justice professionals and the public that the current systems for safeguarding abused and neglected children are hobbled by fragmentation of services and policies.[1] Key problems include: