We Are Survivors 

This blog is dedicated to the tens of millions of adult survivors of child abuse and neglect who get up every day and try to work and function in a world that seems to not care about us.

Indifference is as Disturbing as the Crime (Part 2 of 2)

The failure by senior government officials to condemn Hastert is matched by the health care media and professional health associations’ failure to report the health consequences resulting from childhood sexual abuse.

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Serenabradshaw
Yes it is indeed as disturbing as the crime. We Survivors need more support to speak out and to make public our journeys to try to... Read More
Tuesday, 12 July 2016 11:05
Diane
I agree with you wholeheartedly! That is why I have been speaking out on this blog, in public speeches, and anywhere else I can to... Read More
Wednesday, 13 July 2016 15:15
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Indifference is as Disturbing as the Crime (Part 1 of 2)

This past April 8th federal prosecutors made known former Republican House Speaker, Denis Hastert, sexually molested at least four boys while employed as an Illinois high school wrestling coach beginning in the 1960s. Prosecutors said there was “no ambiguity” about these abuses. They were, they said, “known acts.”[1] While the news was disturbing, sexual and all other forms of child abuse is commonplace.

Best Way to Work with Survivors - Part 2 of 2

This blog is a continuation of Blue Knot Foundation's literature review [1] of best approaches to working with adult survivors of child abuse and neglect. Anyone working with survivors are encouraged to read both posts (Best Way to Work with Survivors - Part 1).

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Best Way to Work with Survivors - Part 1 of 2

The Blue Knot Foundation, formerly known as ASCA (Adults Surviving Child Abuse) did an extensive literature review on the needs of adult survivors of child abuse and neglect.[1] The following principles are important and should be incorporated into standard practice guidelines for professionals working with adult survivors.

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Depressed Mothers

The NIMH has studied the difference between how depressed mothers relate to their children versus healthy mothers. Studies have shown that depressed mothers are more likely to be critical of their children and less likely to talk to them, except under mildly stressful situations, when the depressed mothers tend to overreact. [1] Depressed mothers are more likely to interact with their children because of something within themselves, rather than in response to something the child does or says, and as a result the child has little sense of what to expect.

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