Diane

Cycle of Child Abuse Trauma—Part 1

Child abuse and neglect encompasses lifelong consequences due to what I have identified as a “Cycle of Trauma.” We, as survivors, don’t realize until much later in life that the methods we developed and used to cope as children are carried forward into our adult lives. I’ll discuss four aspects of the trauma cycle, both in childhood and then how it is carried forward into adulthood. It begins with what I call the “original setup.”

Diane

Consequences of Child Neglect

By failing to have a consistent and adequate caretaker, an infant or young child will be unsuccessful in achieving the goal of establishing and maintaining an ongoing relationship with their adult caretaker. The consequences of such a failure can be profound. Through these repeated, neglectful experiences with a caretaker, an infant or child develops an expectation of being neglected by others in the future. Therefore, the child’s sense of self is adversely affected.

Diane

Juvenile Sex Offenders – Part 1

The childhood experiences of physical and/or sexual abuse, being neglected, and witnessing family violence have been associated with juvenile sex offending. A study of 1,600 juvenile sex offenders from 30 States found that only 1/3 of the juveniles perceived sex as a way to demonstrate love or caring for another person; others perceived sex as a way to feel power and control, to dissipate anger, or to hurt, degrade, or punish others.1

Diane

Child Abuse and Youth Violence

If you want to understand the underlying causes of youth violence, look at how many of America’s young children are treated at home. Child abuse increases the chances a child will become violent because it interrupts their normal emotional, social, and intellectual development. Listed below are ways in which child abuse can shape aggressive behavior.1